A Ticker's guide to the
Flora & Fauna
around Hatfield Colliery

Each photograph will open in it's own window
All photographs on this page are ©A Covell 2003

Barn Owl
Tyto alba
Resident

Blackbird
Turdus merula

Resident

Black-headed gull
Larus ridibundus
Resident

Blue tit
Parus caeruleus
Resident

Brambling
Fringilla montifringilla
Winter visitor

Chaffinch
Fringilla coelebs
Resident


Collared dove
Streptopelia decaocto
Resident

Coot
Fulica atra
Resident


Cuckoo
Cuculus canorus
Summer visitor

Curlew
Numenius arqata
Resident

Dunnock
Prunella modularis
Resident

Fieldfare
Turdus pilaris
Winter visitor

Goldfinch
Carduelis carduelis
Resident

Great tit
Parus major
Resident

Greenfinch
Carduelis chloris
Resident

Green Woodpecker
Picus virudis
Resident

Grey heron
Ardea cinerea
Resident

Grey partridge
Perdix perdix
Resident

House martin
Delichon urbica
Summer visitor

House sparrow
Passer domesticus
Resident.

House Sparrow  (c) Adge Covell

 

Jay
Garrulus glandarius
Resident

Jackdaw
Corvus monedula
Resident

Kestrel
Falco tinnunculus
Resident

Kingfisher
Alcedo atthis
Resident

Lapwing
(peewit, or
green plover)
Vanellus vanellus
Resident

Linnet
Carduellis cannabina
Resident

Little owl
Athene noctua
Resident

Magpie
Pica pica
Resident

Mallard
Anas platyrhynchos
Resident

Mistle thrush
Turdus viscivorus
Resident

Moorhen
Gallinus chloropus
Resident

Pheasant
Phasianus colchicus
Resident

Pied wagtail
Motacilla alba
Resident

Redwing
Turdus iliacus
Winter visitor

Reed bunting
Emberiza schoeniclus
Resident

Robin
Erithacus rubecula
Resident

Rook
Corvus frugilegus
Resident

Song thrush
Turdus philomelos
Resident

Skylark
Alauda arvensis
Resident

Sparrowhawk
Accipiter nisus
Resident

Starling
Sturnus vulgaris
Resident

Swallow
Hirundo rustica
Summer visitor

Swift
Apus apus
Summer visitor

Tawny owl
Strix aluco
Resident

Tree sparrow
Passer montanus
Resident

Wood pigeon
Columba palumbus
Resident

Wren
Troglodytes troglo-
dytes

Resident

Yellowhammer
Emberiza citrinella
Resident

 

 

Ash
Fraximus exelsior
Ash

Blackthorne

Prunus spinosa
Blackthorne

Crab apple
Malus sylvestris
Crab apple

Elderberry
Sambucus nigra
Elderberry

English Elm
Ulmus procera
English Elm

Goat willow
Salix caprea
Goat willow. Also called pussy willow.

Hawthorne
Crataegus monogyna
Hawthorne

Pedunculate Oak
Quercus robur
Pedunculate oak

Silver Birch
Betula pendula

Sycamore
Acer pseudoplatanus

White Willow
Salix alba

Horse Chestnut
Aesculus hippocastanum

 

 

There are many other varieties of trees growing in gardens in the local area, but most of these are of foreign origin, grown for ornamental purpose.

There are various examples of nonnative species growing around the area of the colliery, including a grape vine growing among the hedgerows surrounding the playing fields!

Field Bindweed
Withywind

Hedge Bindweed
Great Bindweed
Bellbine

Common Birds-foot-trefoil
Bacon and eggs
Fingers and thumb
Shoes and stockings
Tom Thumb
Black Medick
Bramble
Blackberry
Broad-leaved dock
Greater Burdock
Common Burdock
Arcticum lappa
No image at this time
Meadow Buttercup
Gold-cup
Butter Flower
Meadow Crowfoot
Upright Crowfoot
Great Willowherb
Epilobium hirsutum
Bladder Campion
White Bottle
Red Campion
Red Robin
Bridget in her bravery
White Campion
Common Chickweed
Satin Flower
Adder's Meat
Stellaria media
No image at this time
Red Clover
Purple Clover
Honeysuckle
White Clover
Coltsfoot
Tussilago farfara
No image at this time
Common Centaury
Comfrey
Knitbone
Blackwort
Ass ear
Symphytum officinale
Common Valerian
All heal
Cat Valerian
Doves-foot Cranesbill
Creeping cinquefoil
Ox-eye Daisy
Daisy
(with Black medick)
Dandelion
Red Dead Nettle
White Dead Nettle
Blind nettle
Dummy Nettle
Deaf Nettle
Snake flower
Dog Rose
Downy Rose
Fat Hen
Wild Goose Foot
Dirty Dick
Chenopodium album
No image at this time
Foxglove
Dead Man's Bells
Purple Foxglove
Goatsbeard
Greater Mullein
Aaron's rod
Adam's Blanket
Adam's Flannel
Verbascum thapsus
Groundsel
Smooth Hawksbeard
Hogweed
Kecks
Common cow parsnip
Knotgrass
Polygonum aviculare
No image at this time
Common Knapweed
Hardhead
Loosestrife
Yellow & Purple
Lythraceae
Common Mallow
Rags and tatters
Common Melilot
White Mustard
Sinapis alba
Stinging Nettle
Nipplewort
Perforate St. John's wort
Common St. John's wort
Greater Plantain
Lamb's tongue plantain
Waybread

Ribwort Plantain
Ribbed Plantain
Common Poppy
Red, Field or Corn Poppy
Corn Rose
Primrose
Primula vulgaris
No image at this time
Ragged Robin
I found several plants in 2002
but in 2003 the area was hard
grazed by horses
Lychnis flos-cuculi
No image at this time
Common Ragwort
Stinking Willie
St.James wort
Staggerwort
Stammerwort
Rayless Mayweed
Pineapple mayweed
Rosebay Willowherb
Flowering-willow
Fireweed
Common Self Heal
Carpenter's Herb
Hook-heal, Sicklewort
Prunella, All heal
Sloughheal
Scarlet Pimpernel
Shepherd's weather glass
Anogallis arvensis
No image at this time
Shepherds Purse
Pickpocket
Soapwort
Common Sorrel

Sowthistle
Several var. inc:
prickly, smooth & perennial

Germander Speedwell
Bird's Eye
Veronica chamaedrys
No image at this time
Greater Stichwort
Stellaria holostea
No image at this time
Biting Stonecrop
Teasel
Venus's bath (or basin)
Musk Thistle
Spear Thistle
Lesser Yellow Trefoil
Vetch
Several var. inc:
Common, Tufted (pic),
Wood, & Milk
Woody Nightshade
Solanum dulcamara
Wormwood

Woundwort
Several var. inc:

Hedge & Field (pic)

Yarrow
Millfoil
Thousand leaf
Hundred leaved grass
Bloodwort & Nosebleed
Yellow Iris



Of course there are many critters that I have trouble identifying, including this moth which I found flying in the daytime in the field behind where the Peacock stood.



Day flying moth?

 

 

Photographs for this page were collected between
2002 - 2003
Any significant findings will be added later.

Pipistrelle Bat
Pipistrellus pipist-
rellus

Fallow Deer
Dama dama

Red Fox
Vulpes vulpes


Brown Hare

Lepus europaeus occidentalis

Hedgehog
Erinaceus europeaus

Brown Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Common Shrew
Sorex araneus

Grey Squirrel
Scuirus carolinensis

Mole
Talpa europaea

House Mouse
Mus musculus domesticus

Wood Mouse
(Long-tailed field mouse)
Apodemus sylvaticus

Rabbit
Oryctolagus cuniculus

Stoat
Mustela erminea

Bank Vole
Clethrionmomys glareolus

Common Vole
Microtus arvalis

Water Vole
Arvicola terrestris

Weasel
Mustela nivalis

----------

Adder or Viper
Vipera berus berus

Common Frog
Rana temporia

Common Toad
Bufo bufo

Grass Snake
Natrix natrix

Smooth Newt
Triturus vulgaris

----------

Brandling
Eisenia foetida

Earthworm
Lumbricus terrestrialis
(also many other ssp of LUMBRICIDEA, inc Allobophora)

Garden Slug
Arion hortensis


Garden Snail

Helix aspersa

Large Black Slug
Arion ater var ater

Large Red Slug
Arion ater var rufus

Yellow Slug
Limax flavus

 

Insect, arachnids & myriapods.

The diversity of insect life around this area such that it would take more space than I have available to cover every specimen I've listed, and then there's those I've yet to add to the list.
The following is just a brief collection of those which I have managed to photograph so far.

 


Buff Tailed Bumblebee
Bombus lapidarius

Several species of bees inhabit the area around Hatfield Colliery. Many are of the wild Bombus variety, but an equal number are of the domesticated Apis variety.

 

I've studied the Cinnabar at some length for the last year, and I believe I can forecast that next year (2004) will prove to be the year of the Cinnabar.
This species of moth lays it's eggs on ragwort plants. The larva feed exclusively on this kind of plant, an activity which has been recognised world wide. In various parts of the USA, New Zealand and Australia. the Cinnabar has been purposely introduced as a boilogical control for famland which has been overrun with ragwort. This plant is regarded as a major past, as it is known to be poisonous to grazing animals.
This year I have noted a great increase in the number of caterpillers attacking ragwort plants in this area. An increase in caterpillers usually indicates an increase in adults in the following year.

 

Over the last year I have noted a great many types of Butterfly and Moth (Lepidoptera) living in close proximity to the colliery.
Butterflies are usually the most prominent, due to their bright colours and the fact that are most usually seen on bright sunny days. Besides those shown below, I have observed several butterfly sp, including orange tips, brimstones, red admirals, peacocks, commas, ringlets, small coppers, small blues, skippers, and the small pearl bordered fritillary.
Moths are evident in large numbers and includes many species, such as hawk moths, grass moths, burnets and tigers.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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